soutenir la religion dans une société pluraliste et dans la vie publique canadienne

Dialogue profond

Bienvenue sur le blog de la Conversation Interreligieuse Canadienne, «Dialogue profond», où les participants à la Conversation partagent leurs points de vue sur l'importance et la nature du dialogue interreligieux et des questions connexes, et également affichent des actualités.

«Dialogue profond» reconnaît que nous pouvons faire plus et mieux ensemble, quand nous avons l'occasion de discuter les choses les plus profondes pour nous. Nous croyons que nos désirs de contribuer au bien-être de tout le monde viennent de l'endroit où résident nos valeurs et nos croyances, pas d'un désir superficiel de s'entendre avec les autres. Quand nous partageons les choses qui détiennent une signification profonde pour nous, non seulement nous nous faisons mieux comprendre, mais nous pouvons également mieux anticiper où et comment nous pourrions améliorer notre collaboration.

Les demandes pour contribuer un blog invité sont bienvenus (envoyer des requêtes à info@interfaithconversation.ca). S'il vous plaît noter que les opinions exprimées dans les blogs et commentaires sont ceux de chaque participant, pas de la Conversation Interreligieuse Canadienne dans son ensemble.

Plans are underway for the fifth iteration of the Our Whole Society Conference to be held May 3-4, 2021, at The Canadian Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg.

"Our Whole Society: Free to Believe, Responsible to Act" will seek to "draw on insights from diverse religious and secular traditions of thought to find common ground that helps us to build a society that is more unified amidst its diversity." The impact of the coronavirus pandemic will be addressed as will be Canada's mixed legacy of promoting religious freedom. 

This event is being postponed to a later date, still to be determined.

The Canadian Interfaith Conversation will host a gathering focused on children’s rights in relation to spiritual development on April 1, from 1:00 to 3:00 PM, at the University of Toronto Multi-Faith Centre, 569 Spadina Avenue.

Participants will be invited into dialogue on the role of faith leaders and faith communities in supporting young people to realize their rights, including their right to spiritual development. Questions to be addressed include:

The Canadian Interfaith Conversation was established to promote harmony and religious insight among religions and religious communities in Canada, strengthen our society’s moral foundations, and work for greater realization of the fundamental freedom of conscience and religion for the sake of the common good and an engaged citizenship. The reports of antisemitic carnivals held in Aalst, Belgium are deeply troubling, and they stand in opposition to the core principles of the Canadian Interfaith Conversation and its desire for constructive expressions of religious and cultural pluralism.

In 2005, the UN General Assembly designated January 27 as International Holocaust Remembrance Day, marking the anniversary of the 1945 liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, the Nazis’ largest death camp where one million Jews perished.

This year’s International Holocaust Remembrance Day ceremonies were particularly poignant as Jews and non-Jews around the world came together to mark 75 years since the liberation, joined by a now-dwindling number of Survivors of Auschwitz and other Nazi death camps. 

Pages